An Organized Cord, Electronic, and Battery Drawer

Before buying our house, we never had enough drawer space to have a junk drawer. We did have a lot of cords and electronic accessories so we had a “cord and battery drawer” in the bottom of a side table. We still have it, and today we went through it all. We found so many cords that we didn’t know what they went to, plus a bunch of cords that we did know where they belonged – with something we no longer owned! This is the gallon bag I am bringing to Best Buy to recycle these cords:

An Organized Cord, Electronic, and Battery Drawer at OrganizationLove.wordpress.com

Some things that went in this bag included:

  • Old cell phone/camera chargers (The cell phones are no longer in our possession)
  • Phone cords (we only use ours for the internet, and we don’t need extra)
  • Computer charger that was broken
  • Cords that we didn’t know what they belonged with

We also threw away a lot, such as:

  • Old memory cards we’ll never be able to use again
  • Multiple camera straps
  • Dead batteries
  • Broken earbuds

We kept chargers and adapters we use.

I labeled anything that wasn’t already with bread ties and Sharpie.

An Organized Cord, Electronic, and Battery Drawer at OrganizationLove.wordpress.com

Also, used twist ties to contain the cords. (Or, once, a toilet paper tube for a longer cord.)

An Organized Cord, Electronic, and Battery Drawer at OrganizationLove.wordpress.com

Used battery containers from the Container Store (found here) to contain batteries of all sizes. I don’t have any C batteries right now and I used the C-sized container to keep extra size AAs.

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Some things I love to have that I keep in this drawer also:

  • A battery checker

An Organized Cord, Electronic, and Battery Drawer at OrganizationLove.wordpress.com

  • A reusable battery charger

An Organized Cord, Electronic, and Battery Drawer at OrganizationLove.wordpress.com

This is the drawer now. It includes

  • chargers
  • adapters
  • battery checkers
  • battery charging device
  • batteries
  • mini flashlight
  • less-used earbuds
  • mini tripod for camera
  • microphone
  • old disposable camera that I’ll use up and find some place to develop
  • old iPod Nano that I only use on long car rides (and the adapter to go with it)
  • camera when I’m not using it – then I don’t lose it so much

An Organized Cord, Electronic, and Battery Drawer at OrganizationLove.wordpress.com

Of course, I have other chargers and electronic accessories that I do not keep in this drawer – such as both our cell phone chargers (used nightly), my laptop charger (used regularly), bigger flashlights, etc.

Do you have a place to store your cords? Have you ever gone through it?

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How to Clean and Care for Your Menstrual Cup

This is part 2/2 in my series on the menstrual cup. Part 1, 9 Reasons Why I Chose a Menstrual Cup, can be found here.

The Diva Cup website really has a great explanation of how to insert the Diva Cup, so rather than restating everything they said, here’s the link: http://divacup.com/how-it-works/how-it-works/. For the record, I use fold option 2, the “push down” method, as pictured:

How To Clean and Care for Your Menstrual Cup

Image courtesy of http://www.divacup.com

Now. What I really wanted to talk about was how to clean and care for your menstrual cup — hence the title of this blog post!

  • While you are menstruating, you need a quicker clean between dumping your cup out and reinserting it. Divacup.com advertises a Diva Wash, but to be honest, I haven’t felt the need for that. I use a non-fragrant soap (Ivory bar soap) and warm water to wash out my Diva Cup.
  • In between cycles, I boil my cup in a small pot that I use ONLY for this purpose! (In fact, it stays in the bathroom when not in use.) Boil for at least 10 minutes… make sure not to boil all the water away or the cup will burn.
  • If at any time there is blood in the little holes around the rim of the cup, you have to clean that out, because it is the little holes that create the suction and hold it in place. To do this: Fill the cup with water, hold in one hand, cover the large opening with other hand, turn upside down, and push down on opening. The pressure pushes water through the holes and cleans them out. Just be careful where the water squirts (I hold it down in the sink.) Do not use toothpicks or any other way to clean the holes, as those can damage the cup.

Lastly, storage of your menstrual cup. The Diva Cup comes with a cotton bag. Be sure not to store your cup in a plastic bag. It’s important because the cotton is breathable.

Have you made the switch to a menstrual cup yet? Let me know!

The opinions stated in this blog post are mine alone. Facts and photo were obtained from http://www.divacup.com.